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CSF and WWF deliver policy forum on infrastructure and biodiversity in Nepal

In May Conservation Strategy Fund and World Wide Fund for Nature - Nepal (WWF Nepal) held a one-day policy forum on biodiversity conservation and infrastructure development. The forum covered environmental economics and policy tools used to integrate conservation and infrastructure plans in Nepal. The discussion focused on how infrastructure planning and decision-making could be improved across the Himalayan Region. Dr. Krishna Chandra Paudel, Secretary of Nepal’s Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, specifically addressed the need to comprehensively evaluate infrastructure projects and policies at the national level.

Himalayan infrastructure from a conservation economics perspective

CSF recently completed our second course in the Himalayan region, Analysis of Infrastructure from a Conservation Economics Perspective Course. The course, held at the Ugyen Wangchuck Institute for Conservation and Environment (UWICE), was CSF's first to focus primarily on infrastructure development in the region from a conservation economics perspective. UWICE's beautiful campus located in the culture and biodiversity-rich Bumthang served as a great location for the 22 Himalayan-based participants to learn about economic tools for conservation and infrastructure planning.

Propuestas ganadoras buscan proponer soluciones innovadoras para la conservación de la biodiversidad en la Amazonía Andina

La Iniciativa para la Conservación en la Amazonía Andina (ICAA) felicita a los ganadores de las becas de las propuestas para Investigaciones Económicas Aplicadas para la Conservación en la Amazonia Andina, quienes recibirán hasta US$15.000 para desarrollar sus propuestas. Además, contarán con asistencia técnica y capacitación en teoría económica y análisis económico ambiental durante el tiempo que dure la investigación, a fin de mejorar sus capacidades para realizar estudios de investigación económica aplicada...

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Photo Credit: ICAA/USAID

Economic Tools for Conservation and Infrastructure Planning in the Albertine Rift

From June 11-22, 2012, twenty-eight environmental professionals from eight African nations gathered at the Rwenzori International Hotel in Kasese, Uganda to learn how economic approaches can help them address environmental impacts of infrastructure development in the Albertine Rift.

photo of Andes mountain road

Fortalecimiento de capacidades institucionales para la aplicación de herramientas económicas para la conservación en proyectos de infraestructura - Perú

CSF presenta un nuevo programa de fortalecimiento de capacidades, esta vez, a nivel institucional y a través de una capacitación que combina sesiones online con talleres presenciales . Este programa es financiado por USAID y la Fundación Gordon y Betty Moore a través del programa BUILD (Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development).

Elephants in the Albertine Rift

Economic Tools for Conservation and Infrastructure Planning in the Albertine Rift

Conservation Strategy Fund held a course in Economic Tools for Conservation and Infrastructure Planning in the Albertine Rift, from June 11-22, 2012 in Uganda. This course was offered in partnership with the Ugandan National Environmental Management Agency (NEMA) and was made possible through the support of the United States Agency for International Development, the Wildlife Conservation Network, and the Handsel Foundation. We invited applications from people who work in Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Ecosystem Spotlight: The Albertine Rift

Photo of gorilla in the Albertine Rift, Uganda

The Albertine Rift is the 920-mile long western area of the East African Rift, covering parts of Uganda, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania. It runs from the northern end of Lake Albert to the southern end of Lake Tanganyika. Formed over millions of years, the Albertine Rift is the result of two tectonic plates that once collided and are now slowly moving apart. This geologic activity has created some of Africa's tallest mountains and many of the world's deepest lakes. In addition, the unique variation in elevations has contributed to the diversity of habitats that include wetlands, alpine grasslands, lowland and montane forests, and woodland savannas. Within these habitats, one finds everything from active glaciers to volcanoes.

Southern Tropical Andes Research Fellows

In 2008, CSF held a workshop for decision-makers to illustrate to key partners how economic analysis can help conservation initiatives. Many representatives attended from NGOs as well as government and cooperation agencies working in Peru and Bolivia. An advanced conservation economics course was then taught to 25 participants from Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. We received over 200 applications for the course and out of those, accepted 25 participants.

CSF course graduate will guide Peru's parks

Carlos Soria was among the first 22 conservationists to receive his economics education from CSF, back at our first course in 1999. The Peruvian lawyer was named this month as the new General Secretary of Peru's entire collection of national protected areas. Carlos has distinguished himself over the years at the Instituto del Bien Común (IBC), in the national ombudsman's office (Defensoría del Pueblo) and other key positions. As head of SERNANP (the Spanish acronym for the park service) he will oversee 73 nationally protected areas covering around 15% of the country's territory. They span a wide diversity of habitats, from Amazon jungles to high Andes reserves and marine parks.

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