Language:

From all of us at CSF: Thank you!

Happy Holidays, Felizes Fiestas, Boas Festas, Selamat Berlibur

Every day, support from donors like you makes our work possible. Are you willing to make a special year-end donation to help us protect ecosystems around the world?

Please, click here to make your donation now. 

Is the Goat Islands project dead?

In October of last year, CSF published a study in collaboration with Niras Fraenkel Ltd. and the Conservation Agreement Fund and with funding from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, on the environmental and economic impacts of building a port on Jamaica's Goat Islands. The findings were positive: building an equivalent facility at a place called Macarry Bay, to the west of Goat Islands, would cost an estimated $200 million less to build, and will a far smaller environmental cost.

Series of workshops focus on economics of biodiversity and ecosystem services

asuncion_workshopTransport specialists and workshop participants, Asuncion, Paraguay

Ecosystems in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) sustain hundreds of millions of people, but are threatened by a series of interlocking challenges. Rapid development and population growth have placed increasing pressure on natural resources. Pollution, deforestation, infrastructure, large-scale tourism development, invasive species, and over-fishing all threaten these highly bio-diverse ecosystems, as do the effects of climate change.

The Bahamas learns the value of ecotourism from Belize.

Exuma Cays

By investing in ecotourism, Belize has protected more than a third of it's total land area, as well as about 13 percent of it's marine area. As a world leader in conservation, CSF's Venetia Hargreaves-Allen believes the Bahamas could learn significantly from Belize's success. Formerly the principal investigator for the Marine Managed Area Economic Valuation in Belize with Conservation International, Hargreaves-Allen turned her focus to the Bahamas in a marine management study conducted in 2010. She recently presented her findings at a public meeting at the Bahamas National Trust.

Syndicate content