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CSF celebrates its 15th birthday with 15 stories of success

conservation economics CSF strategy fund

Since 1998, Conservation Strategy Fund has been committed to making conservation efforts smarter through the use of economics. To celebrate, we're going to be sharing 15 stories over the course of the next few weeks. Each of these stories reflects how CSF's unique training and research programs equip people with the ability to both calculate and articulate the benefits of doing development right. Read our first story below and follow the series through our blog or on Facebook, and share your story at info@conservation-strategy.org.

Business plans for the Tacana communal lands in Bolivia

a man zip lining in the Bolivian amazon

Under the second phase of the Initiative for Conservation in the Andean Amazon (ICAA) of the United States Agency for International Development and in collaboration with Wildlife Conservation Society, CSF is moving forward with the creation of three sustainable business plans for the indigenous Tacana community. The community, located in Bolivia's Amazon region north of La Paz, is home to approximately 5,000 people. Their land is known in Spanish as a Tierra Comunitaria de Origen, and is similar to a Native American reserve in the U.S., designated as a permanent home for the Tacanas to continue their traditions. It is located on the banks of the Beni River in the village of San Miguel del Bala.

CSF launches new capacity building program

Knowledge of economic tools in conservation shouldn't just exist on an individual level. In order to make an even bigger impact on nature, CSF is taking its training to the institutional level this month with Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in Bolivia. WCS was selected by CSF for our first ever In-House Training, funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's Andes-Amazon Initiative (AAI). WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, global conservation, education and the management of the world's largest system of urban wildlife parks.

photo of river in the Bolivian Amazon

Cost-benefit analysis of the Cachuela Esperanza Hydroelectric Project

The Cachuela Esperanza hydroelectric mega-project is part of the South American Infrastructure Integration Initiative (IIRSSA). It refers to a 990MW hydroelectric dam that would be built on the Beni River on the outskirts of the Cachuela Esperanza village. This would provide energy to populations in Northern Bolivia and would allow the exportation of electricity to Brazil. The feasibility report, as ordered by the Bolivian government, shows that the environmental and social damages caused by this project would be massive - more than 900Km2 flooded and almost 100,000 people affected. Despite these impacts, the government considers this to be a beneficial project and has continually vowed the desire to move forward with it.

Fellowship selection process continues with workshop in Coroico, Bolivia

CSF has gathered a group of emerging conservation economists in the tropical Andes to help them design research that will contribute to sustaining ecosystems in the region. The program is part of the Initiative for Conservation in the Andean Amazon (ICAA) of the United States Agency for International Development. Today in Coroico, Bolivia, the CSF technical team is evaluating 20 research proposals - finalists from 100 submissions - in order to select up to 10 awardees, who will receive research grants and a year of mentoring from CSF.

Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD)

Through an agreement with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) has launched a comprehensive initiative in central Africa, expand CSF’s programs in the Andes-Amazon region, and initiate a limited program in Asia’s Himalayan region. The goal of the program is to promote biodiversity conservation through infrastructure best practices.

CSF People: Alfonso Malky Harb

Born in La Paz, Bolivia, Alfonso Malky Harb first came to CSF as a student in 2006, where he participated in the Madidi National Park course on economic tools for conservation. Two years later, Alfonso joined CSF as an Economic Analyst in the Bolivian office. With a Master's degree in Agricultural Economics from Catholic University of Chile, an undergraduate degree in Economics from the Bolivian Catholic University, and a diploma in Environmental and Social Research Methods from PIEB (Programa de Investigación Estratégica en Bolivia), he was a natural fit for CSF.

Photo of a road in the Bolivian Amazon

Fortalecimiento de capacidades institucionales para la aplicación de herramientas económicas para la conservación en proyectos de infraestructura - Bolivia

CSF presenta un nuevo programa de fortalecimiento de capacidades, esta vez, a nivel institucional. Este programa es financiado por la Fundación Gordon y Betty Moore.

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