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Marañón: The social and environmental costs of five hydroelectric projects

Marañon river Amazon basin Peru hydroelectric project

Fisherman on the Marañon river. Photo credit: Jose Carlos Rubio

The Marañón River contributes about ten percent of the total water discharged by the Amazon river into the Atlantic Ocean, and transports approximately forty percent of all sediments carried in the Peruvian part of the Amazon watershed. Along with the Ucayali and Madre de Dios rivers, it is one of the main tributaries of the Amazon basin in Peru.

Marañón: Costo social de los impactos acumulativos de cinco proyectos hidroeléctricos

Series number: 
50

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Water Services and Protected Areas in Peru

Similar to other national protected areas' systems across the world, Peru’s national parks are underfunded. SERNANP, the national protected areas agency, is currently evaluating the funding needs of the national parks under its responsibility, to prepare a plan to address this gap. The Project Finance for Permanence initiative (or Patrimonio del Peru–PdP, as known locally) is based on similar experiences in Brazil and Costa Rica, where governments and donors agree to provide funding to permanently support the financial needs of the protected areas, while contributions are conditional to compliance with commitments to achieve protection goals and increase public funding for protected areas, within an agreed period of time.

Yaguas Analysis- Part II

SERNANP, Peru’s national protected areas agency, requested CSF in late 2015 to carry out a cost-benefit analysis for the creation of a new national park in a remote part of the Amazon basin. The proposed Yaguas National Park is located in northeastern Peru, and will extend over 800,000 hectares.

Economic Analysis of Hydroelectric Projects in the Marañón River Basin

The Marañón River, along with the Ucayali and Madre de Dios rivers, is one of the main tributaries of the Amazon in Peru. The Marañón basin also concentrates many of the planned hydroelectric projects in Peru. More than 20 dams, of which at least six are in advanced stages of planning or execution, can significantly affect the biodiversity and environmental services provided by this key basin of the Amazon.

The impacts of these projects are not limited to their direct effects (flooded towns and crops, displaced communities, deforestation, habitat loss, etc.), but also result in compounded impacts in terms of the hydrological cycles, sediment and nutrient transport, interruption of fish migratory and reproduction routes, and alteration of the flooding regime in the Amazon plains.

Opportunity cost assessment and mapping Tropical Andes

International climate change discussions have identified the use of economic incentives as an important means to reduce deforestation. Governments in the Amazon Andes have created or are in the process of creating incentive mechanisms to pursue this goal, frequently alongside other complementary development and conservation objectives.  In order to be most effective, one of the key pieces of information that these mechanisms need is the opportunity cost of conservation. Unfortunately, this data is remarkably scarce in the region.

CSF Graduate Fernando León Named Vice Minister of Environment in Peru

 

Photo for Vice Minister Fernando Leon Post

Vice Minister Fernando León (second from left) with Felipe Vásquez (CSF Fellows Mentor, left) and CSF staff members Cristian Vallejos, Rocío Moreno, Aaron Bruner and Alfonso Malky during the 2nd ICAA Fellows selection workshop in Arashá, Ecuador, July 2013.

BUILD Synthesis Report

From 2011-2015, CSF engaged in a comprehensive global initiative through the Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD) program of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). This report highlights key elements of this multi-year, multi-continent set of infrastructure related projects, and includes an appendix of all activities by region.

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