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Indonesia's 2016 Economic Tools for Marine Conservation

A little over one month ago, CSF completed its second Indonesian Economic Tools for Marine Conservation course hosted in Bali. Twenty-four Indonesian conservation professionals from nineteen institutions participated in the two-week course. Some of the institutions represented were the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, Dept. of Environment and Forestry, University of Indonesia, TNC, WWF, as well as other national universities and NGOs and private consultants.

Indonesia marine conservation economics CSF strategy fund

Yayasan Strategi Konservasi Indonesia

CSF Indonesia launch event

Dr. Rusdian Lubis, Mubariq Ahmad, and John Reid

It is with great delight that we announce the official launch of CSF Indonesia!

Economic Tools for Marine Conservation - Indonesia 2016

The course gave me new perspective on how economics can give solutions to marine problems. I will teach what I learned here to my students in Papua. Marsi Adi Purwadi, Papua

Twenty-four Indonesian conservation professionals participated in the two-week CSF’s course held in Bali on May 2016. Nineteen institutions were represented including the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, Dept of Environment and Forestry, University of Indonesia, TNC, WWF, as well as other national universities and NGOs and private consultants.

Mubariq Ahmad to Lead CSF-Indonesia

Mubariq Indonesia conservation strategy fund

Conseravation Strategy Fund is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr. Mubariq Ahmad as the first Director of CSF-Indonesia. Mubariq has enjoyed a 30-year career working as economic policy researcher and professional activist in a variety of organizations including The World Bank (2009-2015), WWF (2003-2009), and LEI/Indonesian Ecolabeling Institute (1997-2000). He will take the helm of CSF's program on February 1.

CSF dives into Indonesia!

Potato Game

The outdoor pavilion in the center of Mimpi Resort Menjangan rang with shouts of “Potatoes! Very Cheap!” “$6 a bag! Who will sell for 6?” “Cheapest in town! Come see my potatoes!” “Who wants to make a deal?” And our course on Economic Tools for Marine Conservation in Indonesia was underway. Twenty-two participants from institutions around the country were engaged in their first economic game, experiencing the principles of microeconomics by participating in a market, and working towards an equilibrium price for a sack of potatoes.

Economic Tools for Marine Conservation - Indonesia 2015

“This course is really helpful for people making decisions or designing projects. By looking at things from an economic perspective, we can take into account the externalities that will likely affect the program.” -Indonesia 2015 Course Graduate

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