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Oceans & Fish

Oceans and coastal environments are home to tremendous biodiversity, provide food to over a billion people, and livelihoods for hundreds of millions more. But fisheries are common-pool resources and therefore subject to systematic overexploitation. Economic analysis, in combination with sound biological assessments, can help create the political will and technical knowledge to implement strong fisheries management (or co-management) systems, marine protected areas, and ocean infrastructure that maintain the economic value of fisheries and oceans over the long term. CSF’s Oceans and Fish program provides training for local resource managers and targeted economic analyses to guide public investments and policy decisions.

Dreams Become Reality: Economic Tools in Mexico City

Mexican course graduatesFrom left to right: Laura Rodríguez, Eglé Flores, Eduardo Ponce Guevara, Ángela Mojica
and CSF's Cecilia Ayala. © Eduardo Ponce Guevara

It all began with four course graduates from CSF's International Training Course, held annually at Stanford University: Eduardo Ponce Guevara, Eglé Flores, Ángela Mojica and Laura Rodríguez. These alumni, all from Mexico and the surrounding area, dreamed of bringing the Economic Tools for Conservation Course back home to be conducted in Spanish for their colleagues.

Series of workshops focus on economics of biodiversity and ecosystem services

asuncion_workshopTransport specialists and workshop participants, Asuncion, Paraguay

Ecosystems in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) sustain hundreds of millions of people, but are threatened by a series of interlocking challenges. Rapid development and population growth have placed increasing pressure on natural resources. Pollution, deforestation, infrastructure, large-scale tourism development, invasive species, and over-fishing all threaten these highly bio-diverse ecosystems, as do the effects of climate change.

Curso Ferramentas Econômicas para a Conservação

Vinte e três participantes, de 18 organizações, entre elas, IBAMA, ICMBIO, GIZ, participaram do Curso Ferramentas Econômicas para a Conservação, realizado, pela CSF Brasil, de 28 de julho a 08 de agosto de 2014, em Santana do Riacho, na Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais, Brasil. O Curso contou com o apoio do Ministério do Meio Ambiente, da Agência Alemã de Cooperação para o Desenvolvimento – GIZ e da Confederação Nacional da Indústria por meio do Projeto TEEB Regional-Local.

Foram abordados temas como: Microeconomia, Instrumentos Econômico, Valoração Ambiental, Economia de Recursos Naturais e Análise Custo-Benefício.

Alguns comentários dos participantes:

”O curso vai apoiar na decisão de novos produtos e argumentação em reuniões técnicas/políticas.”

CSF developing first online course in partnership with Duke University

As part of CSF's Conservation Economics Initiative, we are developing an innovative online Coastal Conservation Economics course in partnership with Duke University. The 4-month distance-learning course will be launched in January 2015, and will include interactive lectures, video lessons, webinars, virtual office hours, readings, exercises and exams, with an expected time commitment of about 3 hours per week.

New CSF econ video series released

Want to know why environmental problems happen? How to value things in the natural environment? The essentials of fisheries and forestry economics? Step-by-step instructions on cost-benefit analysis? As part of the Conservation Economics Initiative, we just released an exciting new collection of video lessons intended for anyone interested in learning basic environmental economic concepts, refreshing what was learned in our courses, or to complement lectures.

Webinar with Duke University draws diverse crowd

As part of our expanding Conservation Economics Initiative, CSF held our first webinar last month in collaboration with the Marine Ecosystem Services Partnership (MESP) at Duke University. Brian Murray, Director for Economic Analysis from the Duke Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, discussed carbon sequestration benefits in terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

Training Partner Network launched in Mexico and Bhutan

CSF is launching its Training Partner Network as part of our Conservation Economics Initiative to bring economics training to more conservation professionals around the world.  This effort is made possible thanks to a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

One of the cornerstones of the Initiative is a network of CSF Training Partner organizations offering conservation economics training in parts of the world where we do not have our own training teams.  The Network will be supported by CSF and by our academic partners throughout the globe.

Value-chain analysis of sea cucumber fisheries

CSF is partnering with the government of Ngardmau State, Palau, to conduct a value-chain analysis of their sea cucumber fishery. For the community of Ngardmau, sea cucumbers represent an important species culturally and, if managed properly, have the potential to significantly improve economic conditions in the area. The second highest-valued export commodity within the Pacific, sea cucumbers are among the few resources that can deliver profits at the village level.

Community Cost-Benefit Analysis

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

In September 2009, Theresa Kas visited the small village of Sohoneliu in the Manus Province of her native Papua New Guinea. It was a dramatic change of scenery from Stanford, where, a month earlier, she had completed Conservation Strategy Fund’s international “Economic Tools for Conservation” course. Kas, who works with The Nature Conservancy, saw that deforestation was on the rise and traditional hunting was dwindling, and wondered if the local economy’s resource base was careening toward collapse. So she pulled out her CSF notes and put them to use.

Bringing CSF’s Conservation Economic Tools Training to Development Banks

Last month, we had the opportunity to bring CSF’s economic analysis training to a new audience – the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in Washington D.C.  The IDB approves over $11 billion dollars in loans each year, and is a major force in shaping the face of development in Latin America.  We delivered two training workshops for transport and water sector specialists from various country offices, and a shorter session for IDB Economists based in D.C.

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