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Oceans & Fish

Oceans and coastal environments are home to tremendous biodiversity, provide food to over a billion people, and livelihoods for hundreds of millions more. But fisheries are common-pool resources and therefore subject to systematic overexploitation. Economic analysis, in combination with sound biological assessments, can help create the political will and technical knowledge to implement strong fisheries management (or co-management) systems, marine protected areas, and ocean infrastructure that maintain the economic value of fisheries and oceans over the long term. CSF’s Oceans and Fish program provides training for local resource managers and targeted economic analyses to guide public investments and policy decisions.

Khan Academy Economics: A Resource for CSF Graduates

Khan Academy logo

Khan Academy is an extraordinary phenomenon in education. In just a few years, the organization has posted thousands of short videos with instruction on an ever-widening array of topics. Including economics. We like their economics videos so much they are now all available on CSF's website as well as the Khan site.

CSF course graduates frequently ask us to refresh their memory on a particular topic - "What exactly is consumer surplus?" - and Mr. Khan now is available to explain. The videos average around 10 minutes and use very helpful graphics to explain the concepts.

CSF People: Alfonso Malky Harb

Born in La Paz, Bolivia, Alfonso Malky Harb first came to CSF as a student in 2006, where he participated in the Madidi National Park course on economic tools for conservation. Two years later, Alfonso joined CSF as an Economic Analyst in the Bolivian office. With a Master's degree in Agricultural Economics from Catholic University of Chile, an undergraduate degree in Economics from the Bolivian Catholic University, and a diploma in Environmental and Social Research Methods from PIEB (Programa de Investigación Estratégica en Bolivia), he was a natural fit for CSF.

Economic Tools for Conservation in Micronesia

Conservation Strategy Fund's Economic Tools for Conservation training course was offered March 12-13, 2012 in Pohnpei, Micronesia in partnership the Micronesian Conservation Trust (MCT). The course was offered thanks to a grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

The course was CSF's first in the Western Pacific region.

The training supported conservation of marine and forest resources in Micronesia by equipping conservation practitioners, natural resource managers and community leaders with the principles and tools of conservation economics.

CSF featured in Northern California's Press Democrat

Highlighting the announcement of the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions, the front-page article profiles the history of CSF and the importance of our work globally.

“We are recognizing organizations that are doing phenomenal work, and often under the local radar screen,” Steve Cornelius of the MacArthur Foundation said. “They have identified a niche. They have simply been the main organization working in getting these economic principles out.”

Read the article here

Image credit: Christopher Chung/The Press Democrat

CSF receives 2012 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions

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Today the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation named Conservation Strategy Fund as a recipient of the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions. The award recognizes CSF’s innovative work using economics to conserve the world’s most important ecosystems and provides us with a grant of $750,000. The MacArthur Award honors and supports our efforts to creatively address the the loss of unique natural ecosystems by equipping front-line environmentalists with skills to calculate and economic costs and benefits of solutions and thereby come up with answers that will actually work.

The Bahamas learns the value of ecotourism from Belize.

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By investing in ecotourism, Belize has protected more than a third of it's total land area, as well as about 13 percent of it's marine area. As a world leader in conservation, CSF's Venetia Hargreaves-Allen believes the Bahamas could learn significantly from Belize's success. Formerly the principal investigator for the Marine Managed Area Economic Valuation in Belize with Conservation International, Hargreaves-Allen turned her focus to the Bahamas in a marine management study conducted in 2010. She recently presented her findings at a public meeting at the Bahamas National Trust.

Are you a CSF Course Graduate? Tell us your story and you could win an iPad.

Dear CSF Course graduate,

How has economics helped you protect nature?

Have you used the tools you learned in your CSF course in your work?

Tell us your story, and we will help you share it with the CSF community and the world. The author of the best story will win a brand new Apple iPad!

For the full details, click here.

Economic Tools for Conservation - 2011 International Course

Conservation Strategy Fund successfully completed its 13th annual training course Economic Tools for Conservation, August 15-26, 2011 at Stanford University. This course was offered in partnership with the Center for Conservation Biology and the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford.

Over the last decade, this course has become recognized as the premier applied economics training event for conservation professionals from around the world.

Building Economics Skills to Sustain Conservation in the Southern Tropical Andes

Fostering local talent in Conservation Economics is a key piece in the puzzle of protecting the rich biodiversity of the tropical Andes region. With support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and others, CSF is delivering an integrated training package to address this need. The project began in 2009 with Conservation Economics instruction for decision-makers and young economists. It has continued with a competitive program of research grants for economists interested in working on conservation themes in the rain forest regions of Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador.

British Columbia Salmon Farming

Conservation Strategy Fund provided economic analysis to a joint initiative of the Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform (CAAR) and the fish-farming firm, Marine Harvest Canada (MHC). This cooperative venture sought to understand the financial and environmental costs and benefits of different approaches to raising salmon in the coastal province of British Columbia. CSF’s team included consulting economists Glenn Jenkins, George Kuo and Leonard Leung, of Queens University in Ontario. Findings of the analysis will serve the company and CAAR members as they pursue environmental quality in the context of ever-growing seafood market.

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