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Protected Areas

Protected areas are the cornerstones of conservation; they are the places where the full functioning of ecological processes is allowed to occur, with benefits that spill out into the surrounding seascapes, landscapes and communities. But protected areas are under constant pressure to demonstrate their economic value and have thus suffered reductions in area and levels of protection. Conservation can be accomplished by showing the affordability and substantial benefits of protected areas. CSF’s Protected Areas program provides training for park managers, advocates and inhabitants, as well as economic analyses including revenue strategies, financing plans, economic valuation, and economic impact analyses to support the effective design and use of parks and reserves. CSF envisions a world where policy-makers understand the value of protecting the planet’s most biodiverse marine and terrestrial ecosystems, a world in which protected areas are well-funded, well-managed, used by the public, and expanding.

Análisis económico y ambiental de carreteras propuestas dentro de la Reserva de la Biosfera Maya

Series number: 
8

El efecto Chalalán: Un ejercicio de valoración económica para una empresa comunitaria

Series number: 
13

Beneficios y costos del mejoramiento de la carretera Charazani - Apolo

Series number: 
14
Photo of invasive swordfern in forest

Economic Impacts of Invasive Species

In 2006 and 2007, CSF worked with The Nature Conservancy to develop an interview-based economic assessment process to assist developing countries in evaluating and addressing the impacts of invasive species.

CSF conducted economic assessments of invasive species of particular concern in Uganda, Ghana and Zambia in partnership with CABI Africa and The World Conservation Union (IUCN) as part of the UNEP/GEF project "Removing Barriers to Invasive Plant Management in Africa."

In the Ashanti region of Ghana, we found that the aggressive invasive tree Broussonetia papyrifera (Pulp mulberry) can reduce land rents by 50%, and decrease yields by 50% - 90% for important crops such as maize, cocoa and cassava.

International Economic Tools Course August 10-21, Stanford University, USA

Course participants at Golden Gate Bridge

CSF held its 2009 International Economic Tools Course from August 10-12, 2009 at Stanford University in California, USA.

During the two-week course, participants learned to use economics to be more strategic and successful in their conservation work. Participants studied natural resource and environmental economics, practiced communication and negotiation techniques, and got hands-on experience with cost-benefit analysis.

Group photo at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Economic Tools for Conservation - 2009 International Course

In 2009 Conservation Strategy Fund gave its 11th annual international training course Economic Tools for Conservation at Stanford University. During the two-week course, participants learn to use economics to be more strategic and successful in their conservation work. Participants study natural resource and environmental economics, practice communication and negotiation techniques, and get hands-on experience with cost-benefit analysis. This course is presented in partnership with the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford University and The Nature Conservancy.

Program
The course covers the following subjects:

Microeconomics
Market theory: supply, demand, market equilibrium, and competition.

Photo of a deep sea giant turtle swimming in clear tropical sea water.

Ocean Economics - Abrolhos Reef, Brazil

Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) conducted economic valuation research of Marine areas in Belize, Panama and Brazil. This work was supported by Conservation International’s Marine Management Area Science program. Valuation of ecosystem goods and services was carried out within three formally protected marine areas: Gladden Spit (Belize), Coiba (Panama) and Abrolhos (Brazil).

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