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The use of contingent valuation for evaluating protected areas in the developing world: Economic valuation of Morro do Diabo State Park, Atlantic Rainforest, São Paulo State (Brazil)

El efecto Chalalán: Un ejercicio de valoración económica para una empresa comunitaria

Series number: 
13
Photo of invasive swordfern in forest

Economic Impacts of Invasive Species

In 2006 and 2007, CSF worked with The Nature Conservancy to develop an interview-based economic assessment process to assist developing countries in evaluating and addressing the impacts of invasive species.

CSF conducted economic assessments of invasive species of particular concern in Uganda, Ghana and Zambia in partnership with CABI Africa and The World Conservation Union (IUCN) as part of the UNEP/GEF project "Removing Barriers to Invasive Plant Management in Africa."

In the Ashanti region of Ghana, we found that the aggressive invasive tree Broussonetia papyrifera (Pulp mulberry) can reduce land rents by 50%, and decrease yields by 50% - 90% for important crops such as maize, cocoa and cassava.

Group photo at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Economic Tools for Conservation - 2009 International Course

In 2009 Conservation Strategy Fund gave its 11th annual international training course Economic Tools for Conservation at Stanford University. During the two-week course, participants learn to use economics to be more strategic and successful in their conservation work. Participants study natural resource and environmental economics, practice communication and negotiation techniques, and get hands-on experience with cost-benefit analysis. This course is presented in partnership with the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford University and The Nature Conservancy.

Program
The course covers the following subjects:

Microeconomics
Market theory: supply, demand, market equilibrium, and competition.

Tenosique: análisis económico-ambiental de un proyecto hidroeléctrico en el Río Usumacinta

Series number: 
10
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