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Resplendent Roadkill, Almost

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

On a clear day from the top of western Panama’s 11,400-foot Volcán Barú, you can see the Pacific Ocean to the south and the azure Caribbean to the north. A little harder to spot is the best route around the dormant volcano, the centerpiece of the 35,000-acre Volcán Barú National Park. In 2003, CSF and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) performed an analysis to find out.

Safari Economics: Making More of Tanzania's Megafauna

success stories conservation economics CSF strategy fund

http://conservation-strategy.org?1384467323

Tanzania’s national parks teem with the big storybook animals: rhinoceroses, lions, elephants and hippopotami.  Only a few parks however, have historically teemed with visitors.

Economic tools for responsible infrastructure

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p>This past June I spent three weeks in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) facilitating one of CSF’s flagship Economics Tools for Conservation courses. The course focused on infrastructure planning and biodiversity conservation in the Albertine Rift. The course was delivered in partnership with L'École Régionale post-universitaire d'Aménagement et de gestion Intégrés des Forêts et territoires Tropicaux (ERAIFT). Holding the course in DRC was a great opportunity to share economic tools with conservationists and infrastructure planners that work in an area which faces new and rapid development options.

Economic Tools for Conservation - 2014 International Course

“I gained a deeper understanding of microeconomic principles and why they can help conservationists and development practitioners. I met wonderful people that share similar values and will be a great resource for my work and inspiration for some time to come.” –Ulrike Troeger, Germany, 2014 International Course Participant

Do you want help designing an analysis or research project?

CSF is opening a program of “office hours” with experts who will help you figure out what to analyze and how. These consultations are free and an exclusive service for graduates of CSF courses..

Here’s how it works: Click on the link below and provide some basic information about the issue, problem, policy or activity you want to analyze. We’ll gather the ideas and set up a meeting for you with a member of our staff or one of our consulting experts via videoconference or telephone.

Examples of analyses we will help you design could include

• cost-benefit analysis of a sustainable development project,
• revenue strategy for a protected area,
• formulation of arguments to confront a specific environmental threat,
• economic valuation of an ecosystem or protected area,

CSF welcomes Aaron Bruner - Senior Economist

Since he was a young child, Aaron Bruner has been interested in forest conservation. For much of his youth, he had intended to be a conservation biologist, but while at Wesleyan University, he had an economics professor who "blew his mind", and he realized that the best route to accomplish conservation was through the power of economics. It was then that he chose to study economics as an undergraduate in order to be able to speak the language of policy-makers and developers to achieve the greatest impact.

Dogs and cats: helping farmers and cheetahs coexist in Botswana

When people think of sub-Saharan Africa, they are often imagining the landscape of Botswana, although they may be unaware of it. Images of the Kalahari populate the spreads of nature magazines; the mysterious gazes of lions, elephants, and buffalo calling readers to adventure. Admiring photographs such as these in my youth brought me to my current work, and last month I was fortunate enough to have a dream realised and visit the Kalahari myself.

CSF, thanks to funding from the Handsel Foundation, is working along with Cheetah Conservation Botswana (CCB) to conduct a cost benefit analysis (CBA) of alternative predator control methods used by small stock farmers in the Kalahari agro-ecosystem.

New grant kicks off CSF's Conservation Economics Initiative

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation awarded a grant of $256,000 this month to support CSF's Conservation Economics Initiative. The CEI is a CSF-Duke University effort to spread the effective use of conservation economics to benefit natural ecosystems. Moore's support, along with funds from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, will be used to set up local hubs where CSF-style conservation economics courses can be delivered by our own course graduates. The CEI will also take CSF's deep in-person training know-how and transform it into online teaching resources to make sure that more conservationists learn the economic essentials and that our students have knowledge at their fingertips when they need it.

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